Tagged: mobile

Social Media Observation: EA China’s Weibo Account

Let’s begin by taking a look at EA China’s landing page:

EA China's Weibo Landing Page

EA China’s Weibo Landing Page

As you can see, like Ubisoft China, EA China’s landing page is also well-developed with a profile page and a background that is consistent with the organization’s positioning, a list of links to the subsidiary accounts and a message board.

Let’s find out if EA China is developing substantial contents on the page:

EA China, like Ubisoft China, also releases information on games that won’t be coming to China, but with less counts, based on the contents provided by EA China, a followers would easily notice that most of the tweets are related to EA’s mobile apps, which is consistent with EA’s current strategy in the China market – mobile gaming. Furthermore, tablet/mobile games are accessible for Chinese gamers, so instead of putting informations that Chinese gamers can’t relate (about PC/consoles that can’t be purchased in China), content’s of tablet/mobile games are more attractive to Chinese gamers.

However, it seems that EA China is covering gamers’ gaming experience of PC/Console games(e.g. trivia of Dead Space series, the celebration of N7 Day from the Mass Effect Trilogy) at the same time with it’s awareness of the pirated versions of EA products. From my standpoint, this is EA’s effort to promote it’s gaming culture , however, this might go both ways: there is a possibility that the gamers, who play pirated EA games, would think that EA is embracing their behaviors by communicating related gaming events with them.

What about Interactions with the followers?

A Sample of EA China's interaction with customers

A Sample of EA China’s interaction with customers

Questions, Retweets, Polls and interactions on the message board. It seems like EA is doing a much better job interacting with followers compared to Ubisoft. Besides that, the tone EA China uses is very casual and humorous when communicating with followers.  With the efforts EA China put into online interaction, it is certain that followers are more likely to engage with the brand because they get the sense of their voices being heard.

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Tablet/mobile gaming? It’s still cute for China.

If the current gaming environment in China stays the same for PC and gaming consoles, would  tablet/mobile gaming be a new way out? With a increasing number of quality games for our smartphones and tablets, this solution seems very promising.

However, if focusing on tablet/mobile gaming is what Chinese gaming industry choose to progress then the Industry needs to wait.

Here are the reasons:

1. The limitation of gaming types and mechanisms:

What are the most popular games on your devices? Social games (Word with Friends, Draw Something, any game that ends with “ville” or “story”). These kind of games fits for the device perfectly because tapping and dragging would be the majority of your actions when playing social games and your smartphone/tablet’s touchscreen is perfect for your actions.

However social gamers are not the majority of gamers in China. Like everywhere else, gamers are roughly divided into three groups: role playing (RPG), action (ACT) and first person shooting (FPS).

If the tablet/mobile games want to reach out to these 3 groups, the touch screen would be considered as a disadvantage sometimes: aiming on an enemy by scrubbing your finger on the touch screen is harder than it looks compared to moving your joysticks or your mouse; you won’t be sure if you have hit the virtual button on the screen because the screen is flat. your touch screen might not be able to receive your action correctly if you have sweaty hands.

Recently developers brought out the controller attachment to the tablets (as shown in the picture below). Does this solve the problem? yes and no.

A controlling attachment aims to boost your tablet gaming experience

I don’t need to explain the “yes” part as the picture is very self-explanatory. The “no part” on the other hand is about your investment.

Normally an action game (or RPG or FPS) won’t exceed the price of $6.99, but a controller like this probably would cost you about 30 bucks. Does the improvement of your gaming experience worth the price?

Also, if you have been a frequent tablet/mobile gamer. you will notice that an RPG or action game lasts shorter than you have expected. Of course it can’t last for 10-12 hours of gaming time because you might have paid only $3.99 for the game, another reason is that your device (whether it’s your smartphone or your tablet) can’t hold a game that’s as big as a game for your Playstation. Do you really want to spent 30 bucks to play games that are not long enough?

2. The perception of tablet/mobile gaming in China:

“I grew up playing games that takes a long time and requires complex commants, I don’t really want to settle for games like Angry Birds.” Given the factors I mentioned in the last bullet, mobile/tablet gamers are considered casual gamers in China. It’s not that the notion of casual gamers is negative, it is just that the notion is new to Chinese gamers, and it is hard for the Chinese gamers to participate in the transition.

Also, if we’ve overcame the transition, the mobile characteristics enabled us to play games wherever we want and whenever we want and that will eventually lead to playing games at work/school (actually people are doing this nowadays). There is a chance that your boss/professor does not like this characteristics as much as you do, not to mention your parents, who might have already been pissed by the fact that your play video-games.